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Favorite Logo Re-Designs of 2015

A new year is a time for reflection, so we’re looking back on last year’s best logo redesigns. Follow along as we recap these bold and beautiful business moves:

Brand logo

Verizon
This is probably the most popular and obvious change on our list. This logo has seen many variations since the company first came about, but was always haunted by the imbalance of its giant check mark and outdated gradients. This year they made the leap to modern minimalism to match what the company calls “a renewed purpose at Verizon.”

Brand logo re-designs

The New York Times
A quick glance at this redesign and you might have missed it. But one thing is for certain—you actually read it this time. Seeing as the company can most plainly be described as a publication for daily reading, this subtle change in spacing between letters and words makes all the difference in legibility.

Brand logo re-designs

Alaska Airlines
With more notoriety comes a lesser need for explanation. While the company hasn’t condensed their name, this year, “Airlines” was de-emphasized as purely a strapline. To match their “new flight experience”, the font was smoothed out, cleaned up and given a bit of room to breath, allowing for a fresher, more grown up look.

Brand logo re-designs

IHOP
Everyone’s favorite breakfast stop has long taken a lighthearted approach to breakfast, from their playful “Rooty Tooty Fresh n’ Fruity” pancakes to co-op campaigns with a multitude of children’s box office hits. So to reinforce that happy feeling, the company issued their first logo redesign in over 20 years—with a smile.

Brand logo re-designs

Coors Light
The second most popular beer in America started with a minimalist design, and somewhere along the lines became a wild mess of drop shadows, cartoony graphics and Monday Night Football typography. In 2015, they stripped all of that away to create a cleaner look—though still visually interesting—that maintains recognizability.

Brand logo

Spotify
This logo redesign is a perfect example of purposeful branding—not just updated art. Spoitfy has long been transitioning the purpose of its brand to a musical experience. Their latest campaigns offer visual interpretations of certain songs and artists, but how do you communicate ever-changing melodic moods with a stagnant icon? For this reason they pared down the graphics, and allowed for the logo to be recolored based on the emotional feeling of its current application. Nothing says customized experience like a color-changing logo.

Brand logo re-designs

Primal Cravings
What kind of editorial would this be without a shameless plug from the author? Last year we were approached by Primal Cravings, a west coast based food preparation and delivery service that was gaining momentum fast. In order to set the company apart from the white noise of “paleo” and body-building focused brands, The Creative Bar focused on a fresh (pun intended) new re-design that emphasized the simple convenience of their services, and the freshness of the ingredients themselves.

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